April 7, 2014

Calligraphies, by Adrian Dax (1913-1979), La Brèche, No. 1, 1961

The Duchamp Dictionary, an Art and Alchemy exhibit in Düsseldorf, Meret Oppenheim, and more updates in publications and events.

March 26, 2014
"Le Développement d’une certitude," by Guy Hallart (1931-2002), cover of La Brèche #3.

"Le Développement d’une certitude," by Guy Hallart (1931-2002), cover of La Brèche #3.

March 24, 2014
Invisible Heads hardcover release


Originally released as a two-volume set, Invisible Heads is now available as a single and more durable hardback edition, including indexes and other updates. At 760 pages, it’s a unique collection of over 40 years of poetry, painting, dance and theater works, photography, assemblages, essays, games and more by dozens of artists and writers. Available at:

http://www.lulu.com/content/hardcover-book/invisible-heads-surrealists-in-north-america-an-untold-story/14365911

March 18, 2014
André Breton, Jacquline Lamba, and Aube Breton in the U.S. in 1945.
The Association Atelier André Breton has added to their archive website a trove of photographs and documents from Breton’s years in New York including materials for VVV, notes on poem-objects, and other manuscripts, available here.

André Breton, Jacquline Lamba, and Aube Breton in the U.S. in 1945.

The Association Atelier André Breton has added to their archive website a trove of photographs and documents from Breton’s years in New York including materials for VVV, notes on poem-objects, and other manuscripts, available here.

February 20, 2014
Untitled (1960s), by Unica Zürn
From Ubu Gallery’s current exhibit of works by Brion Gysin, Henri Michaux, Judit Reigl, and Unica Zürn (all images visible at ubugallery.com). More exhibits listed on Events page.

Untitled (1960s), by Unica Zürn

From Ubu Gallery’s current exhibit of works by Brion Gysin, Henri Michaux, Judit Reigl, and Unica Zürn (all images visible at ubugallery.com). More exhibits listed on Events page.

5:02pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zh-yKt180AZ81
  
Filed under: unica zurn 
February 13, 2014

February 12, 2014
The Passive Vampire

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"I climb this staircase not to get to the first floor but to get closer to myself. I lean on the banisters not to avoid vertigo but to prolong it. If when I get to the top floor I open a door that leads straight out onto the street, I will fall into space but will not die. If I do happen to die, it is a phenomenon used by another objective and more easily understandable phenomenon only as a pretext. I understand the feeling of guilt but I do not understand death."

—from The Passive Vampire, by Ghérasim Luca (translated by Krzysztof Fijałkowski for Twisted Spoon Press)

On February 26 New York’s Romanian Cultural Institute will present an evening dedicated to Gherasim Luca; see Events for more details.

7:27pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zh-yKt17EF4gs
  
Filed under: Gherasim Luca 
February 2, 2014
Double Agony: Gorky and Mimaroglu

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Agony, 1947, by Arshile Gorky

Agony, composed in 1965, by Ilhan Mimaroglu

January 22, 2014
Things are afoot: A Hannah Hoch exhibit at Whitchapel Gallery, Has’s Hourglass Sanatorium at Lincoln center, and more exhibits, screenings, and talks are coming up (see Events) as well as new items in print including Merl Fluin’s Deadwax Inscriptions, the English translation of Patrick Lepetit’s The Esoteric Secrets of Surrealism, and Henri-Pierre Roché’s novel about his New York years with Duchamp, Cravan, and Picabia (see Publications).
Image: Flight, 1931, by Hannah Hoch

Things are afoot: A Hannah Hoch exhibit at Whitchapel Gallery, Has’s Hourglass Sanatorium at Lincoln center, and more exhibits, screenings, and talks are coming up (see Events) as well as new items in print including Merl Fluin’s Deadwax Inscriptions, the English translation of Patrick Lepetit’s The Esoteric Secrets of Surrealism, and Henri-Pierre Roché’s novel about his New York years with Duchamp, Cravan, and Picabia (see Publications).

Image: Flight, 1931, by Hannah Hoch

January 9, 2014
A Current Note on an Old Letter about the Future: Thom Burns on Vincent Bounoure

Recently, Thom Burns sent me a note of explanation and response to a letter he received from Vincent Bounoure, a founder of the groupe de Paris du mouvement surréaliste in 1970 and author of many works, including Le surréalisme et les arts sauvages, La peinture américaine, and Vision d’océanie. The letter appears in the Anon Editions collection Invisible Heads, which may be downloaded for free for a limited time at Lulu.com.

There are certainly pages of Invisible Heads that could use extra commentary. This concerns just one. In volume two in the chapter on Arizona on page 494 there is a letter in translation from Vincent Bounoure addressed to me dated December 16, 1985. In it is expressed something about the subject bravely termed “civilizations without writing,” by which he means, in particular, Native Americans and the people of Oceania whose artistry once profoundly interested surrealists, although he is speaking much more broadly about tribal peoples throughout the world. You, dear reader, know without much fuss precisely who and what the author of Surrealism and the Savage Heart means by the term.

Although the letter is addressed to me while I yet lived in San Francisco, it finds its place in the Arizona chapter of Invisible Heads because it marks, at the time anyway, my last formal contact with the surrealist movement and coincides with the beginning of my journey to Arizona, which will take another five years to complete. He is responding to a letter I wrote to him after I learned of the death of his wife Micheline. I do not have a copy of my letter but I remember that in it I express condolences and remind him of the life-affirming ceremonials of the Hopi people to which my friends and I are already witness, and through which new friendships and collaborations with Hopi individuals are forming. I offer assistance as liaison or guide should he choose to get away from Paris—it might do him some good after all even if it means stepping on US soil to get there.

It is interesting that he can find no words to respond to this invitation but chooses instead to respond to my admonishment of surrealists for essentially ignoring the vast ceremonial habitat of “primitive art” in favor of its narrow plastic power as a source of “convulsive beauty,” which in my opinion makes it generally a flat aesthetic concern like any other. To this I use, like anyone would, the example of Jean Benoit’s grand ceremonial as a touchstone leading in the right direction out of the gallery and into live realms. To this also, for reasons I can only unfairly speculate, he chooses to refrain from comment.

I met Bounoure in 1976 and experienced the weekly meetings of his Bulletin de liaison surréaliste (BLS). In writing to him nine years later I sought and achieved clarity about a certain insufficiency in surrealist material culture; it is incapable of conveying the common thread it has often explicitly presumed to share with its counterpart in “civilizations without writing.” Beyond that are the shadows because he indeed expressed the point quite unequivocally: There can be no hope of achieving anything close to the deeper meanings radiating from Oceanic or Pre-Columbian works unless life as a whole is changed. Only then, in his opinion, will we again communicate with that ancient lucidity restored. My opinion will be different; achieving the lucidities of meaningful communication with artifacts and particular attire, rhythms and voice, dance, time, place, and good cause, is something clearly available everywhere as long as those rare birds who pick up the cause will be up to the task. This is the last contact I have with Vincent Bounoure. Then the deserts are soon in bloom and in 1985 the Surrealist Movement is getting so damn old.

For more on Bounoure and the Paris group of the surrealist movement, see the review of Insoumission Poétique.